Sacsayhuaman: How did they do that, anyway?

800px-Sacsayhuaman-c01.jpgPhoto by User:Colegota, CC BY-SA 2.5 es, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=773741

 

This wall is from Sacsayhuaman Cusco. We know why they built it this way—to withstand earthquakes. We do not know how. Here are some possible explanations:

Acoustics:

Theoretically sound vibrations may have been used to move the stones into place. We know we can do it with smaller stones.   And we have a good description 0n how the Tibetans may have done it.

 

Herbal preparation:

Lifting stones is one thing Shaping them is another. How would the ancients make stone malleable? Shripad S. Akkivalli from India claims his father did it with an herb. There is a legend in Peru of using just such a technique. It was reportedly witnessed by a Catholic priest in 1983.  That wall would take a lot of juice!

Vitrification:

Basically, this means the stone was melted, and then presumably poured in place. The evidence for this is the glass-like (vitrified) finish on many of the stones.

We find vitrification all over the world. Indeed, in Europe there are many “vitrified forts.” (Experiments have been done and no wood fire is hot enough to vitrify rock.) We also have vitrified sand known as desert glass in Egypt, Libya, Australia, and Tasmania.

Geopolymers:

Joseph Davidovits has stated the blocks of stone used in the Great Pyramid are geopolymers, a type of limestone concrete. So were they poured?

Guess, chip, and check

Of course the prevailing theory is that the ancients used a “guess, chip, and check” method on each stone, some of them up to 12 sided.

 

Here is a close-up of a wall at Sacsayhuaman:

800px-Sacsahuaman_masonry2.jpg                                                                        Wikimedia-no attribution given

 

You decide.

 

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